Frequently asked questions

Please read through our frequently asked questions below to find the answer to your enquiry. If you cannot find the information you're looking for, please email our friendly teacher engagement and registration staff.

FAQs for renewal of registration

Read our frequently asked questions about the renewal registration process.

I still haven't completed my annual registration tasks, when will they become available again?

If your registration number starts with a 1, 2, 3 or 4, annual registration will be available in your MyVIT account from Friday 4 October 2019. A late payment fee will be applied from this date.

Why did I receive an SMS from VIT?

If you had not completed all annual registration tasks (including payment of the annual registration fee) by 23 September 2019, VIT may have sent you a reminder SMS.

If you have made payment of the fee, you may disregard this message.

How do I reset my password?

If your registration number starts with a 1, 2, 3 or 4, your username is your VIT registration number. To reset your password, enter an incorrect password and follow the prompts. Please note you may be required to do this up to 5 times.

If your registration number starts with a 6, your username is your email address. To reset your password, click the ‘forgot your password’ link where you usually log in. Please ensure you select 'I’m a Teacher', or 'seeking to register as a Teacher' and not 'I’m an Employer of Teachers’.

Why am I receiving a message that my email address / user ID is not valid?

You may be receiving a message that your email address or user ID is invalid because you are using a different email address, or attempting to log in to the incorrect portal.

If your registration number starts with a 1, 2, 3, or 4, please go to MyVIT Login, select ‘I have a current account’ and ‘My VIT number starts with a 1, 2, 3, or 4’. Your username is your VIT registration number.

If your registration number start with a 6, please go to MyVIT Login, select ‘I have a current account’ and ‘My VIT registration number starts with a 6’. Please select 'Continue' on the 'I'm a Teacher, or seeking to register as a Teacher' section. Your username is the email address you set up your MyVIT account with. This may be your university email address. If you cannot remember your password, and do not have access to the email address you set up your account with, please contact us.

I received a ‘UKDynamics’ error, how do I fix it?

This is a known error that may occur if you update your personal details while completing your annual registration, have multiple tabs of MyVIT open or have your data (e.g. mobile phone number) entered in a non-standard format. To resolve the error and complete your annual registration tasks, please log out of your MyVIT account, close all tabs, and log in again.

If this occurs you will need to answer the questions regarding your annual registration again – they have not been transferred to VIT.

What do I do if I haven’t taught for 20 days in the last 12 months (e.g. due to family leave)?

If you hold (full) registration, you are required to complete at least 20 days of teaching and 20 hours of professional development each year to maintain your registration.

If you haven’t taught for at least 20 days in the past 12 months, you can pro-rata your teaching days over the last five years. You will be provided with the option at renewal to declare you have undertaken

  • 40 days in the previous two years; 
  • 60 days in the previous three years;
  • 80 days in the previous four years; or
  • 100 days in the previous five years.

If you are not currently employed as a teacher, but are working in a related field, you may also accumulate 20 days of (teaching) practice through equivalent practice or educational leadership.

The professional development requirement of 20 hours cannot be pro-rated.

If you are unable to meet the professional practice and / or professional development requirements above, you will be provided with the opportunity to go to non-practising registration.

When do I have to pay my annual registration fee?

Your annual registration fee is due by 30 September 2019.

Invoices will be sent to you from mid-August 2019. Please note: You are able to log into your MyVIT account and complete your annual registration tasks including payment before you have received your invoice.

Teachers / early childhood teachers with an expiry date of 30 September 2019 will remain on the public register for a three month grace period, and will be able to teach until 31 December 2019. If you make payment after the 30 September 2019 due date, you will be required to pay a late processing fee.

The most current fees and timeline for teacher registration can be found here.

Why is my registration fee higher than usual?

You are due for your five-yearly Nationally Coordinated Criminal History Check, which is required as part of your registration.

Why do I have to pay for a Nationally Coordinated Criminal History Check (NCCHC)?

Registered teachers are required to undergo a five-yearly Nationally Coordinated Criminal History Check in order to maintain their registration.

If the date of your NCCHC is on or before 30 September 2015, you will need to complete a new check and make payment as part of your annual registration tasks this year.

If you hold VIT registration you’re exempt from holding a separate Working with Children Check.

Why is my Nationally Coordinated Criminal History Check incomplete?

Your NCCHC will take up to 20 days to return after payment is made and any required documents provided to VIT.

If you declared a new change of name or previously undeclared name in your NCCHC you have been sent a ‘Name Confirmation Form’ by email. Please follow the instructions on this email and provide the required form and supporting evidence as soon as possible.

If the correct completed documents are not received by 31 December 2019, your name will be removed from the register.

What is annual registration?

The VIT registration year runs from 1 October to 30 September. Each year all teachers will have one or more tasks due to ensure they remain registered for the coming year.

Depending on your registration type, status, and how long you have held registration you will need to complete a combination of the above tasks. The tasks that apply to you will show within your MyVIT account from mid-August and are due by 30 September. 

Annual registration is made up of three tasks

  • Nationally Coordinated Criminal History Check (NCCHC)
  • Renewal
  • Payment

What does renewal of registration mean and does it apply to me?

Teachers who have held (full) registration for 12 months or longer are required to complete the renewal task. If this applies to you, the task will show in your MyVIT account.

Teachers with (full) registration have demonstrated that their professional practice against the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST) standards at the proficient level. To maintain their (full) registration, you are required to renew your registration annually. 

 To successfully renew your registration, you will need to make declarations

  • about your continuing suitability to be a teacher
  • that you have practised for at least 20 days as a teacher / educational leader (or undertaken equivalent practice)
  • that you have completed at least 20 hours of professional development activity that references the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

Read more about renewal and understanding the PD requirements 

Can I use overseas teaching experience for renewing my registration?

Overseas teaching experience can be used to meet the annual renewal of registration requirements.

Can I use PD I undertook overseas to renew my registration?

Professional development undertaken overseas can be used to meet the professional learning renewal requirements, provided the learning can be referenced to the APST.

When will I receive a new card?

Your new registration card will be issued after your annual registration tasks are completed and assessed. Cards may take up to 20 working days to arrive during the renewal period.

Please note that cards for certain registration types (including returning and non-practising) are not processed until after 30 September 2019 as these categories of registration are approved for the new registration year, which means that if you completed your tasks in mid-August, you may not receive your card until mid-October.

If you are required to complete a five-yearly Nationally Coordinated Criminal History Check (NCCHC), your card may also be delayed, as VIT is unable to issue a current registration card until your NCCHC has been updated.

Remember that your registration is valid until 31 December 2019, and you don’t need a new registration card in order to teach. Employers can be satisfied that if your name appears on the public register, then you hold valid VIT registration.

Once you have completed your renewal tasks including making payment, you’ll notice that your expiry date changes to the following year on the public register.

Can I work without a card?

You don’t need a card to prove that you are a registered teacher. Employers can be satisfied that if your name appears on the public register, then you hold valid VIT registration and are able to teach.

If you show on the public register as holding current / practising teacher registration, you can undertake the duties of a teacher in a school, or use your registration to undertake child related work in lieu of a Working With Children Check.

If you show on the public register as holding current / practising early childhood teacher registration you can undertake the duties of an early childhood teacher in an early childhood setting, or use your registration to undertake child related work in lieu of a Working With Children Check.

If you show on the public register (in red) as holding non-practising registration, you can use your registration to undertake child related work in lieu of a Working With Children Check.

How can I pay my annual registration fee?

You can pay your fees online through your MyVIT account.

Do I have to pay a late processing fee?

If you make payment after the 30 September 2019 due date you will be required to pay a late processing fee.
We may consider exempting the late processing fee if you have experienced extended ill health.

We are unable to consider an exemption from the late processing fee if you:

  • change your address/email address but fail to notify us
  • are travelling during the annual registration period
  • have no internet access.

How do I apply for non-practising registration?

If you hold (full) registration and have not met the professional practise and/or professional development renewal requirements, you can apply for non-practising registration. This registration allows you to maintain your registration but does not require you to maintain your professional practice.

You can stay non-practising for as long as you wish provided you pay the annual fee and continue to meet suitability requirements. However, you cannot work as a teacher in a Victorian school, or as an early childhood teacher in an early childhood setting while you hold non-practising registration. 

What if I don’t want to maintain my registration?

If you no longer wish to be a registered teacher / early childhood teacher, please complete the notification of registration cessation form.

What happens if I don’t complete my annual registration tasks?

If you do not complete your annual registration tasks by 30 September 2019, a late processing fee will be applied and you will be given a three month grace period until 31 December 2019. During this time you will remain registered and able to work as a teacher in a Victorian school, or as an early childhood teacher in an early childhood setting while you hold non-practising registration.

If you do not complete your annual registration tasks by 31 December 2019 your name will be removed from the register (either by expiry or suspension). If this occurs you will not be able to work as a teacher in a Victorian school, or as an early childhood teacher in an early childhood setting.

What does it mean to have my registration suspended?

If you have an expiry date later than 31 December 2019 and fail to complete your annual registration tasks, you will be suspended from teaching in Victoria.

This could apply to you if you hold Permission to Teach (PTT), provisional registration or have been granted (full) registration in the last year.

If you are suspended, you can apply to have the suspension revoked if you complete the outstanding task(s) and provide a satisfactory written explanation for your failure to complete these by the due date.

What does it mean if my registration expires?

If you have an expiry date before 31 December 2019 and fail to complete your annual registration tasks, your registration will expire and you will be removed from the register.

If you have been removed from the register and you wish to resume teaching you will need to re-apply for registration and meet all the current registration requirements.

I don’t want to teach after the end of the year, do I have to renew in September to finish out my teaching year?

Teachers with an expiry date of 30 September 2019 will remain on the public register for a three month grace period, and are able to teach until 31 December 2019.

If you hold provisional registration or Permission to Teach (PTT), you will have a payment expiry date and an approval expiry date which are different. All teachers have a payment expiry date of 30 September 2019.

Provided you show on the public register as holding current / practising registration you can continue to use your registration to teach.

If you are not planning on teaching past 31 December 2019, you should apply for non-practising registration or nominate the date you wish to cease your registration by completing the notification of registration cessation form.

What counts as professional development for the purposes of registration?

VIT does not have a definitive list of required PD activities for renewal of registration. You should consider your individual PD needs in relation to 

  • your teaching context;
  • the needs of your learners; and 
  • the priorities of your learning environment or education sector.

You should engage in a range of activities that update your professional knowledge and practice. These may be undertaken individually or with colleagues, in your learning environment or externally, and online or face-to-face. More information on what can constitutes PD is outlined here

You must be able to relate your processional development to the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST), and ensure that at least one standard in each domain is addressed.

Why is my registration card only valid for a few months?

If you hold provisional registration or permission to teach, you will have a different payment expiry date and approval expiry date. All teachers have a payment expiry date of 30 September 2019.

If you have an approval expiry date earlier than 31 December 2019, you will not be invoiced an annual registration fee until you have been approved for a further period of registration.

Where a fee is payable for a period less than 12 months, or between 13 and 14 months, we will calculate it on a pro rata basis.

Provisional card

Provisional registration is granted for a period of two years from the date of approval. Your card will either reflect the end of your 2-year provisional registration or your payment expiry date - whichever comes first.

If you are provisionally registered and card expiry / the date on the public register is coming up in the next 6 weeks, you need to either apply for (full) registration or reapply for provisional registration.

Permission to teach card

Permission to teach (PTT) is granted for a fixed period of time, and does not have a grace period. The approval date on the public register reflects the last day you can work in the approved teaching position. Your card will either reflect the end of PTT registration or your payment expiry date - whichever comes first.

If you hold PTT and your card expiry / the date on the public register is coming up in the next 3 months, and a school wishes to employ you beyond this date, you and the school should begin the process of applying for a subsequent grant of permission to teach. Please refer to the latest PTT policy for eligibility requirements.

Full registration card

Registration application fees are charged on a pro rata basis. If you apply for registration before July, your payment expiry date will be 30 September of the current year. If you apply for registration between July and December, your payment expiry date will be 30 September of the following year.

Can I see an itemised list of what I’m being invoiced for?

Your initial paper invoice will include an itemised list of what you’re being invoiced for and can be used to claim your tax.

What happens if my personal details are not up-to-date and I don’t receive my invoice?

It is your responsibility to advise VIT of any changes to your details, including contact details, in a timely manner.

You do not need to wait until you receive the invoice to complete your registration tasks – you can log into your MyVIT portal from mid-August and complete your annual registration. Once you have paid you annual registration fee, you will be given the option to download or email yourself a tax receipt which mirrors the invoice.

Throughout the annual registration period, we will provide additional invoice notifications via email and SMS. If your contact details are not current and you don’t receive the invoice or reminders to complete your annual registration, you run the risk of receiving a late fee after 30 September 2019. 

Please add VIT to your safe sender list to ensure our emails get to your inbox. We encourage you to open any correspondence from VIT, as it may contain vital information about your registration.

Why did I receive my invoice at a different time to my colleagues?

Invoices are generated by registration type over a two week period due to the high volume. They are sent in batches over this period, which is why colleagues may receive an invoice before or after you do.

You do not need to wait until you receive the invoice to complete your registration tasks – you can log into your MyVIT portalfrom mid-August and complete your annual registration.

Why can’t I make payment directly after 30 September?

The MyVIT portal must go offline from midnight 30 September until 4 October 2019 in order to process the late fees.

I’m planning on being interstate / overseas / offline during renewal period – can I complete it when I return? 

You can complete all annual registration tasks online (usually within 10 minutes) by logging into your MyVIT portalfrom mid-August.

If you make payment after the 30 September 2019 due date you will be required to pay a late processing fee.

We may consider exempting the late processing fee if you have experienced extended ill health.

We are unable to consider an exemption from the late processing fee if you:

  • change your address/email address but fail to notify us
  • are travelling during the annual registration period
  • have no internet access.

If you do not complete your annual registration tasks by 30 September 2019, a late processing fee will be applied and you will be given a three month grace period until 31 December 2019. During this time you will remain registered and able to work as a teacher in a Victorian school, or as an early childhood teacher in an early childhood setting while you hold non-practising registration.

If you do not complete your annual registration tasks by 31 December 2019 your name will be removed from the register (either by expiry or suspension). If this occurs you will not be able to work as a teacher in a Victorian school, or as an early childhood teacher in an early childhood setting.

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FAQs for technical support

Read our technical support guide for the online portal.

How do I reset my password?

If your registration number starts with a 1, 2, 3 or 4, your username is your VIT registration number. To reset your password, enter an incorrect password and follow the prompts. Please note you may be required to do this up to 5 times.

If your registration number starts with a 6, your username is your email address. To reset your password, click the ‘forgot your password’ link where you usually log in. Please ensure you select 'I’m a Teacher', or 'seeking to register as a Teacher' and not 'I’m an Employer of Teachers’.

Why am I receiving a message that my email address / user ID is not valid?

You may be receiving a message that your email address or user ID is invalid because you are using a different email address, or attempting to log in to the incorrect portal.

If your registration number starts with a 1, 2, 3, or 4, please go to MyVIT Login, select ‘I have a current account’ and ‘My VIT number starts with a 1, 2, 3, or 4’. Your username is your VIT registration number.

If your registration number start with a 6, please go to MyVIT Login, select ‘I have a current account’ and ‘My VIT registration number starts with a 6’. Please select 'Continue' on the 'I'm a Teacher, or seeking to register as a Teacher' section. Your username is the email address you set up your MyVIT account with. This may be your university email address. If you cannot remember your password, and do not have access to the email address you set up your account with, please contact us.

Why won’t my MyVIT account load?

If you have a registration number starting with ‘6’, you may experience longer loading times (of up to one minute). If this occurs, please close your current browser and try again in 10 minutes time.

I’m experiencing issues with accessing and completing the renewal form – what can I do?

If you are experiencing issues with accessing the renewal form, your current browser may not be TLS 1.2 compliant.

The links below are for updates to common web browser providers

If you are experiencing issues with completing the renewal form in your education setting, please talk to your IT department about enabling scripts for the VIT website (MyVIT, MyPD and school / employer / early childhood portals).

These scripts are essential for making the renewal form 'smart' (i.e. options appear only in response to certain selections made by a teacher). Without this function, the information supplied in the form may not successfully transfer to our back-end systems.

I received a ‘UKDynamics’ error, how do I fix it?

This is a known error that may occur if you update your personal details while completing your annual registration, have multiple tabs of MyVIT open or have your data (e.g. mobile phone number) entered in a non-standard format. To resolve the error and complete your annual registration tasks, please log out of your MyVIT account, close all tabs, and log in again.

If this occurs you will need to answer the questions regarding your annual registration again – they have not been transferred to VIT.

How do I complete a writable PDF?

If you are required to complete a writable PDF document, please follow these steps:

  1. download the PDF document to your computer 
  2. open the PDF document
  3. click the Highlight Existing Fields button on the message bar to make the form fields easier to identify. Form fields appear with a coloured background (light blue by default), and all required form fields are outlined in another colour (red by default)
  4. click to select options such as tick boxes or click inside a text field to type (some text fields are dynamic, meaning that they automatically resize to accommodate the amount of data you enter)
  5. press Tab to move forward or Shift+Tab to move backward
  6. sign the document by inserting an electronic signature (or see below for alternative option)
  7. when finished, click File and Save As
  8. save the file to your desktop and then attach it to an email to vit@vit.vic.edu.au or alternatively
  9. print and sign the document, scan to your computer and attach it to an email to vit@vit.vic.edu.au

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FAQs for renewal audit

Read our frequently asked questions about the renewal audit process.

I’ve been selected for renewal audit – what do I do?

If you have been randomly selected for renewal audit, you will receive an email containing the Renewal Audit Form PDF, 236.84 KB which needs to be completed and emailed to audit@vit.vic.edu.au.

Why does VIT conduct audits?

VIT conducts audits to ensure the integrity of the renewal process. If you are audited, you will need to provide further information to support your declaration.

All teachers are encouraged to maintain records of their:

  • days teaching, equivalent practice or educational leadership; and
  • hours of professional development activities that update your knowledge about pedagogy, content and / or practice, and reference the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST).

Why do I need to verify my declarations?

Teachers who apply to renew their registration make a self-declaration about their continuing suitability to teach and maintenance of professional practice. A proportion of teachers are asked to provide evidence to support the legally binding declarations they have made. This ensures consistency and compliance, and is a process used by many professions.

Why have I been selected to verify my declarations?

Teachers are randomly selected to provide VIT with evidence of their declarations.

Who is responsible for providing information to VIT for validation of renewal of registration declarations?

It is the responsibility of the registered teacher. VIT will not ask schools or early childhood service to provide this evidence, although a teacher may ask their principal or early childhood leader to validate their claims in respect to teaching days, equivalent practice or educational leadership. By signing a self declaration that they have met the requirements for renewal of registration, a teacher is indicating to VIT they can provide evidence of this if required.

How do I verify my professional practice (days of teaching)?

When applying to renew their registration, teachers indicate they have undertaken 20 days of teaching, equivalent practice or educational leadership in the previous 12 months.

If you are unable to meet at least 20 days of teaching in the past 12 months, you can provide evidence that you have undertaken either:

  • 40 days in the previous two years; 
  • 60 days in the previous three years;
  • 80 days in the previous four years; or
  • 100 days in the previous five years.

Most commonly, a teacher will ask their principal or early childhood leader to complete Section 2: Option A of the Renewal Audit Form PDF, 236.84 KB to verify that the teacher has completed the required number of teaching days.

Casual relief teaching
Teachers who work across a number of schools or early childhood services may wish to confirm their days of teaching, equivalent practice or education leadership by supplying payslips, statements of service or letters on official letterhead, outlining employment dates, their role and numbers of days worked (group certificates are not accepted). Multiple documents may be needed for teachers who have worked in a number of contexts or across a number of schools or early childhood services in the renewal period.

Home schooling
Teachers will be required to be registered with the VRQA as a home schooler and should provide evidence of this. They will also need to provide a statuary declaration advising the number of days of home schooling they completed within the registration year.

Private tutoring
Teachers will need letters from their employer, the parents of the students they tutor or payslips / tax invoices confirming hours of tutoring to prove their currency of practice.

What are the different types of professional practice?

Teaching Undertaking the duties of a teacher in an early childhood centre, primary, secondary or special school.
Equivalent practice

This is typically teaching in a TAFE, University or alternative teaching setting such as the zoo or a museum. If you are teaching in alternative teaching settings or related fields of education, you may be requested to provide further evidence of how your role meets the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

Educational leadership

This is typically the work of a principal or school leader but can also include work for DET, CEO or other educational organisations schools deal with directly. Educational leadership roles can be both in and out of schools where the nature of their work has a relationship with the standards of professional practice. Educational leaders may not be teaching students but their work will directly influence teaching and learning in classroom situations.

How do I verify my hours of professional development?

Teachers can count any reasonable activities they engage in that develop their professional knowledge and practice to support student learning and are relevant to their teaching context. These activities must be relate to the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST). At least some of their 20 hours must fall under the domains of Professional Knowledge, Professional Practice and Professional Engagement.

E.g. in the registration period, a teacher could complete the follow types of professional development which would covers the three domain areas.

Professional Development ActivityAPSTDomain AreaHours / Duration
Using feedback in the classroom. Online webinar by Teacher Learning Network (TLN)5. Assess, provide feedback and report on learningProfessional Practice2 hours
History Teachers of Victoria Annual Conference. ‘Past Tense, Present Tension’2. Know the content and how to teach it
6. Engage in Professional learning
Professional Knowledge
Professional Engagement
12 hours
Participate in school based committee reviewing the wellness policy for students4. Create and maintain supportive and safe learning environmentsProfessional Practice3 hours
Read 4 x Agora (History Teachers of Victoria) Newsletters2. Know the content and how to teach itProfessional Knowledge2 hours
Listening to 2 x VIT podcasts. Teacher Conduct Issues – Social Media and Inappropriate Contact.
Write a reflection on each.
7. Engage professionally with colleagues, parents / carers and communityProfessional Engagement1 hour

How do I log my PD in MYPD?

  1. Log into your MyVIT account
  2. Access My PD from the left side menu
  3. Use ‘Add Teacher PD’ to list each Professional Development (PD) activity you have completed between 1 October 2018 to 30 September 2019 (minimum 20 hours)
  4. Select ‘Download filtered PDs (pdf)’ to create a list of the Professional Development activities you entered

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FAQs for Working With Children Check

Read our frequently asked questions about changes to how we register and regulate teachers, including how we will more closely align with the Working with Children Check (WWC Check) scheme.

General information

How has the registration and regulation of teachers in Victoria changed?

From 1 September 2019, VIT will change the way it registers and regulates teachers in Victoria. In particular, it will assess certain types of conduct to determine whether a person is suitable to be registered, or to remain registered, as a teacher. These assessments will be in addition to the existing ways in which we assess the suitability of teachers.

These new assessments will more closely align with the way Working With Children Check Victoria (WWCCV) assess whether a person can be issued with a WWC Check that permits them to engage in child related work. These assessments will include considering whether the person has been the subject of any category A offences, category B offences, category C conduct, negative notices and interim negative notices.

Read our news article Changes to VIT’s teacher registration scheme for more information.

How do I notify WWCCV of any child-related work (other than teaching)?

You should submit an online form directly to WWCCV outlining the details of your child-related work.

What does suitable to teach mean?

Suitability to teach means whether the person is fit to teach and whether the person is physically or mentally able to teach.

This includes assessing whether the character, reputation and conduct of the person are such that the person should be allowed to teach in a school and / or early childhood service.

This includes consideration of the person’s criminal history, whether the person has engaged in reportable conduct, whether their right to teach or to be employed as a teacher in Australia, or any other country, has been cancelled or suspended, and whether the person is seriously incompetent in their teaching practice.

It also includes assessing whether the person has a physical or mental impairment, disability, condition or disorder including substance abuse or dependence that substantially detrimentally affects their ability to teach.

What is a category A offence?

Under the Education and Training Reform Act 2006, a category A offence includes (but is not necessarily limited to) the following:

  • sexual offences where the person was an adult and the person against whom the offence was committed was a child;
  • child abuse material offences where the person was an adult;
  • murder or attempted murder;
  • rape or attempted rape;
  • forced marriage involving a person under 18 years of age; and
  • using a carriage service for sexual activity and /or to transmit an indecent communication to a person under the age of 16 years. 

If a person makes an application to VIT for registration / renewal of registration, the VIT must refuse the application if the person has been charged, convicted or found guilty of a category A offence. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide the person with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the category A offence.

If the person is a registered teacher, the VIT must

  • suspend their registration if they have been charged with a category A offence; or
  • cancel their registration if they have been convicted or found guilty of a category A offence.

Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide the person with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the category A offence.

What is a category B offence?

Under the Education and Training Reform Act 2006, a category B offence includes (but it not necessarily limited to) the following:

  • sexual offences (other than rape or attempted rape) where the person against whom the offence was committed was not a child;
  • sexual offences where the person who committed the offence and the person against whom the offence was committed were children;
  • stalking;
  • distributing an intimate image or threating to distribute an intimate image;
  • some violent offences (other than murder and attempted murder); and
  • some drug offences such as trafficking or supplying a drug of dependence to a child.

If a person makes an application to VIT for registration / renewal of registration, VIT must refuse the application if:

  • the person is currently charged with, or has been convicted or found guilty of a category B offence; or 
  • VIT considers that the person poses an unjustifiable risk to children.

Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide the person with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the category B offence.

If the person is a registered teacher, VIT may suspend all of their registrations if the person has been charged with a category B offence.

Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide the person with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the category B offence.

What is category C conduct?

Under the Education and Training Reform Act 2006, category C conduct includes (but is not necessarily limited to) the following:

  • convictions or findings of guilt of an indictable offence;
  • non-conviction charge of a category A or B offence;
  • conduct that forms the basis of any disciplinary action taken against a registered teacher by an employer; and
  • conduct that forms the basis of any disciplinary action that has been taken against a person by an entity for which the person works (including as a volunteer) of which VIT becomes aware of under the reportable conduct scheme.

If a person makes an application to VIT for registration / renewal of registration, the VIT may refuse the application if the person has engaged in category C conduct and one of the following applies:

  • the ability of the person to teach in a school / early childhood service is likely to be affected because of the conduct they engaged in; or 
  • it is not in the public interest to allow the person to teach in a school / early childhood service because of the conduct they engaged in.

Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide the person with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the category C conduct.

What is an indictable offence?

Offences in Victoria are classified as either indictable offences or summary offences.

Indictable offences are more serious offences and include theft, causing injury, drug offences, rape and murder. Indictable offences are usually heard before a judge and jury in the County Court of Victoria or the Supreme Court of Victoria. Some indictable offences may also be heard in the Magistrates’ Court of Victoria.

All offences in the Crimes Act 1958 and the Wrongs Act 1958 are deemed to be indictable offences, unless the relevant legislation indicates otherwise.

All offences in other legislation that are described as being level 1-6 or punishable by level 1-6 imprisonment, fine or both are also presumed to be indictable offences, unless the relevant legislation indicates otherwise.

Summary offences are less serious offences and usually include offences such as disorderly behaviour, some assault offences, some driving offences, and willful damage to property. Summary offences may be heard and determined in the Magistrates’ Court of Victoria.

All offences that do not meet the definition of indictable offences above are presumed to be summary offences, unless the relevant legislation indicates otherwise.

What does ‘committed for trial’ mean?

If an indictable offence must be heard in the County Court of Victoria or the Supreme Court of Victoria, a magistrate in the Magistrates’ Court of Victoria will usually first decide if there is enough evidence for the case to proceed in these higher courts.

The magistrate may conduct a Committal Hearing to make this decision. This is a court hearing where the Magistrate will hear some of evidence and decide if there is enough evidence to support the case. 

If there is insufficient evidence, the Magistrate will dismiss the charges. 

If the Magistrate decides that there is sufficient evidence, the Magistrate will decide that the person is ‘committed for trial.’ This means that the case will be transferred to the County Court of Victoria or the Supreme Court of Victoria to be listed for a trial before a judge and jury to determine whether the person is guilty of some or all of the criminal offences for which they have been charged. 

What is common assault?

Common assault is a criminal offence in the Summary Offences Act 1966. It refers to circumstances where a person unlawfully assaults another person. The maximum penalty is 15 penalty units or imprisonment for 3 months.

What is aggravated assault?

Aggravated assault is a criminal offence in the Summary Offences Act 1966. It refers to any of the following circumstances:

  • where a person has been convicted of assault or battery of a male child whose age does not exceed 14 years;
  • where a person has been convicted of assault or battery of any female;
  • where a person who is in the company of another person(s) and assaults another person;
  • where a person assaults another person by kicking; and
  • where a person assaults another person with any weapon or instrument.

What is a ‘non-conviction charge’?

Non-conviction charge is a term used in the Education and Training Reform Act 2006. It refers to circumstances where the charges against a person for a category A offence or category B offence have been finally dealt with other than by way of a conviction or finding of guilt.

A charge is finally dealt with (other than by way of a conviction or finding of guilt) in the following circumstances:

  • the charge is withdrawn;
  • the person dies without the charge being determined;
  • the charge is dismissed by the court;
  • the person is discharged by a court following a committal hearing;
  • the person is acquitted or found not guilty; or
  • the person is discharged by the Magistrates’ Court of Victoria after completing a diversion program.

What is a negative notice?

A negative notice indicates that a person has made an application to WWCCV and they have been refused a WWC Check. It means that the person is not permitted to engage in child related work.

Further information can be found here.

If a person makes an application for registration / renewal of registration, VIT must refuse the application if the person has received a negative notice. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide the person with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the negative notice.

If the person is a registered teacher, VIT must cancel their registration if they have received a negative notice. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide the person with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation about the negative notice.

What is an interim negative notice?

An interim negative notice indicates that a person has made an application to WWCCV and a preliminary assessment has been made that the person may be refused a WWC Check. Before making a final decision, WWCCV will issue the person with an interim negative notice and provide the person with an opportunity to provide additional information and documentation before a final decision is made.

Further information can be found here.

If the person is a registered teacher, VIT must suspend their registration if they have received an interim negative notice. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide the person with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the interim negative notice.

What is the reportable conduct scheme?

The reportable conduct scheme is established by the Child Wellbeing and Safety Act 2005. The Commission for Children and Young People (CCYP) is responsible for administering the scheme. Under the reportable conduct scheme, the heads of certain organisations must:

  • notify the CCYP within 3 business days of becoming aware of a reportable allegation;
  • investigate the allegation; and
  • update the CCYP with detailed information about the reportable allegation, the investigation, the finding, and any action that has been taken in response to the reportable allegation.

Further information can be found here.

What is a reportable allegation? 

A reportable allegation is an allegation, based on a reasonable belief, that an employee or volunteer has committed reportable conduct or misconduct that may involve reportable conduct. 

A reportable allegation may be made about employees or volunteers who are over 18 years of age and who work or volunteer for organisations covered by the reportable conduct scheme. 

Further information can be found here.

What is reportable conduct?

Reportable conduct is defined in the Child Wellbeing and Safety Act 2005. It means:

  • sexual offences (against, with or in the presence of, a child);
  • sexual misconduct (against, with or in the presence of, a child);
  • physical violence (against, with or in the presence of, a child);
  • behaviour that causes significant emotional or psychological harm; and
  • significant neglect.

Further information can be found here.

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School principals and early childhood managers

What are my current reporting obligations as a principal of a school or manager of an early childhood service?

Employers of registered teachers must continue to notify VIT of the following information:

  • any action taken against the registered teacher in response to the following allegations;
    • serious incompetence;
    • serious misconduct;
    • unfitness to be a teacher; or
    • the teacher’s ability to practice as a teacher is seriously detrimentally affected or likely to be seriously detrimentally affected because of an impairment.
  • any other action that may be relevant to the teacher’s fitness to teach.

From 1 September 2019, employers of registered teachers must also notify VIT if the registered teacher:

  • is currently charged with, or has been convicted or found guilty of a category A offence or category B offence; or
  • has been given a negative notice.

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Registered teachers

Do I need a Working with Children Check (WWC Check)?

Registered teachers will continue to be exempt from requiring a WWC Check, but will be required to notify Working with Children Check Victoria (WWCCV) if they engage in any paid or voluntary child-related work (other than their teaching).

If you are undertaking child related work and your employer wants to know more about your exemption, further information can be found here.

What is child related work?

Child related work is work that usually involves direct contact with a child / children in particular services, places, bodies or activities. It does not include occasional direct contact with children that is incidental to the work.

Direct contact with children means any contact between the person and the child that involves:

  • physical contact;
  • face to face contact;
  • contact by post or other written communication;
  • contact by telephone or other oral communication; and
  • contact by email or other electronic communication.

The particular services, places, bodies or activities include (but are not limited to the following):

  • child care services;
  • children’ services and education and care services;
  • educational institutions;
  • accommodation services specifically provided for students in connection with student exchange programs;
  • cultural, recreational or sporting clubs, associations or movements;
  • religious organisations;
  • babysitting or child minding services;
  • fostering children;
  • coaching or tuition services; and
  • business providing:
    • entertainment or party services for children;
    • gym or play facilities for children;
    • photography services specifically for children; and
    • talent and beauty competitions held for children.

Child related work can be paid, unpaid or voluntary work.

Further information about child related work can be found here.

What is a Working with Children Check?

The Working with Children Check is a screening processing for assessing and re-assessing people who work with or care for children in Victoria.

The WWC Check is administered by WWCCV and is governed by the Working with Children Act 2005.

The WWC Check includes considering the person’s criminal history and relevant professional conduct findings.

What is Working with Children Check Victoria (WWCCV)?

WWCCV administer the working with children scheme on behalf of the Department of Justice and Community Safety Victoria.

Their powers and functions are outlined in the Working with Children Act 2005.

The working with children scheme requires people who engage in child related work to obtain a working with children assessment notice unless they are exempt from doing so.

Further information about WWCCV can be found here.

I perform child related work (other than teaching) for an organisation. Even though I am a registered teacher, they require me to have a WWC Check. Do I have to get one?

Even though you are a registered teacher and are exempt from requiring a WWC Check, many organisations may still require you to get a WWC Check. This may be a policy decision made by the organisation. It may also be the organisation’s way of complying with the Child Safe Standards, and trying to ensure that all children are safe.

If you would like to engage in child related work (other than teaching), you will need to check the organisation’s policies regarding the need for a WWC Check.

If you are undertaking child related work and your employer wants to know more about your exemption, further information can be found here.

As a registered teacher, what are my current reporting obligations to VIT?

Registered teachers must continue to notify VIT of the following information:

  • change of their name;
  • change of their contact details (email, phone and address); and
  • when they commence and cease employment at a school or early childhood service.

From 1 September 2019, registered teachers must also notify VIT if they:

  • are committed for trial; or
  • have been convicted or found guilty of
    • a category A or category B offence;
    • an indictable offence;
    • a common assault; or
    • aggravated assault.

As a registered teacher, what is my obligation to WWCCV?

A registered teacher who engages in any paid or voluntary child related work (other than teaching in a school or an early childhood service) must notify WWCCV of the following information:

  • the person or organisation that employs them to engage in child related work; and
  • any agency which they are listed as available to engage in child related work.

For further information about how to discharge these obligations, please contact WWCCV.

Why do registered teachers have to provide information to WWCCV?

Registered teachers are exempt from obtaining a WWC Check in order to engage in child related work (other than their teaching).

If the registration of a teacher is suspended or cancelled, they are no longer able to engage in child related work unless they have obtained a WWC Check.

From 1 September 2019, organisations who engage registered teachers in any paid or voluntary child related work (other than teaching) can be informed when a teacher’s registration is suspended or cancelled. This will help ensure that the person has obtained WWC Check before continuing to engage in the child related work.

This will occur through the following process:

  • registered teachers will be required to notify WWCCV of the child related work (other than teaching) that they undertake.
  • VIT will be required to advise WWCCV when a teacher’s registration is suspended or cancelled.
  • WWCCV will then be able to notify the organisations that engage the teacher in child related work (other than their teaching) that the teacher’s registration has been suspended or cancelled and that they will be required to obtain a WWC Check before they continue to engage in child related work.

I have received a negative notice from Working with Children Check Victoria (WWCCV). What should I do now?

If you have made an application for registration / renewal of registration, you should declare this information in your application to the VIT.

If you have already submitted your application for registration / renewal of registration, you should notify the VIT as soon as possible.

If you have been given a negative notice, VIT must refuse your application for registration / renewal of registration. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide you with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the negative notice.

If you are a registered teacher, you should contact the VIT as soon as possible.

If you have been given a negative notice, VIT must cancel your registration. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide you with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the negative notice.

I have received an interim negative notice from WWCCV. What should I do now?

If you have made an application for registration / renewal of registration, you should declare this information in your application to the VIT.

If you have already submitted your application for registration / renewal of registration, you should notify the VIT as soon as possible.

This information will be taken into account in assessing your application for registration / renewal of registration.

If you are a registered teacher, you should contact the VIT as soon as possible. If you have been given an interim negative notice, VIT must suspend your registration. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide the person with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation relating to the interim negative notice.

I have been charged, convicted or found guilty of a criminal offence in Victoria. What should I do now?

If you have made an application for registration / renewal of registration, you should declare this information in your application to the VIT. 

If you have already submitted your application for registration / renewal of registration, you should notify the VIT as soon as possible.

This information will be taken into account in assessing your application for registration / renewal of registration.

In the case of being charged, convicted or found guilty of a category A offence, VIT must refuse your application for registration / renewal of registration. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide you with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation about the category A offence.

In the case of being charged, convicted or found guilty of a category B offence, VIT must refuse your application for registration / renewal of registration if it considers that you pose an unjustifiable risk to children. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide you with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation about the category B offence.

In the case of engaging in category C conduct, VIT may refuse your application for registration / renewal of registration if VIT believes that you meet one of the following criteria:

  • your ability to teach in a school / early childhood service is likely to be affected because of the conduct that you engaged in; and
  • it is not in the public interest to allow you to teach in a school / early childhood service because of the conduct you engaged in.

Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide you with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation about the category C conduct.

If you are a registered teacher, you have obligations to notify VIT of certain convictions or findings of guilt. However, in all cases, it is recommended that you advise VIT as soon as possible.

If you have been charged with a category A offence, VIT must suspend your registration. If you have convicted or found guilty of a category A offence, VIT must cancel your registration. Prior to making these decisions, VIT will provide you with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation about the category A offence.

If you have been charged with a category B offence, VIT may suspend your registration. Prior to making this decision, VIT will provide you with an opportunity to provide further information and documentation about the category B offence.

This information will be taken into account in assessing / re-assessing your suitability to remain registered as a teacher.

I have been charged, convicted or found guilty of a criminal offence elsewhere in Australia or overseas. What should I do now?

If you have made an application for registration / renewal of registration, you should declare this information in your application to the VIT. 

If you have already submitted your application for registration / renewal of registration, you should notify the VIT as soon as possible.

This information will be taken into account in assessing your application for registration / renewal of registration and whether you are suitable to be registered as a teacher. 

VIT will also determine whether the criminal offence amounts to a category A offence, category B offence, or category C conduct and if so, consider whether it must refuse / may refuse your application for registration / renewal of registration.

If you are already registered as a teacher, you have obligations to notify VIT of certain convictions or findings of guilt. However, in all cases, it is recommended that you advise VIT as soon as possible.

This information will be taken into account in assessing whether you remain suitable to be registered as a teacher.

VIT will also determine whether the criminal offence amounts to a category A offence, category B offence, or category C conduct and if so, consider whether it must / may suspend or cancel your registration.

I have been the subject of a reportable allegation. What should I do now?

If you have made an application for registration / renewal of registration, you should declare this information in your application to the VIT. 

If you have already submitted your application for registration / renewal of registration, you should notify the VIT as soon as possible.

This information will be taken into account in assessing your application for registration / renewal of registration and whether you are suitable to be registered as a teacher. 

If you are already registered as a teacher, you should advise VIT as soon as possible. This information will be taken into account in assessing whether you remain suitable to be registered as a teacher.

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FAQs for provisionally registered teachers

Read our frequently asked questions about the provisional to (full) registration process.

When does my provisional registration expire?

Your provisional registration does not expire on 30 September - this is when you pay your registration and will bring you in-line with the annual registration process for future years - search the register to check the date your provisional registration expires. Your card will either reflect the end of your 2-year provisional registration or your payment expiry date - whichever comes first.

To meet your responsibilities as a registered teacher, before the end of your second year of provisional registration you should apply for (full) registration. If you are unable to apply for (full) registration or if you are not in a position to demonstrate you have achieved the Proficient Teacher standards before your registration expires, you may need to reapply for a further period of provisional registration.

Reapplications for further periods of provisional registration are assessed on their individual merits and are not guaranteed approval. You will be required to submit detailed information outlining

  1. why you have not been able to complete the inquiry approach and apply for (full) registration
  2. how you intend to do this in the next period of provisional registration (if granted)
  3. any other exceptional circumstances

To submit a reapplication for provisional registration, log into your MyVIT account and complete a Reapplication for provisional registration form (Form R). Teachers with a registration number beginning with ‘6’ should contact VIT for a form.

Does the 80 days of teaching have to be completed in one school / service?

You can undertake the 80 days of practice in more than one workplace setting. As long as you can provide evidence that you have taught for 80 days in Australian or New Zealand schools or services over the past five years, these can be in more than one school or service. The evidence can be in the form of statement of service, pay slips or letter / email from the workplace.

It is recommended that before a workplace panel endorses an application for full registration, the workplace needs to have observed the teacher’s practice over an extended period and sight the evidence of teaching days.

The workplace panel will make their recommendation for full recommendation based on a consistent representation of practice over time. The principal, panel chair or their delegate must be satisfied that the teacher has undertaken the Inquiry process and provided sufficient evidence that the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST) at the Proficient Teacher level have been met.

Make sure that if you have completed your 80 days of teaching in more than one school / service that you can provide evidence of your teaching days to the recommendation panel.

Can my 80 days be a mixture of paid employment and volunteering?

The 80 days can be a mixture of paid employment and non-paid employment. If you are engaged in non-paid teaching work, you need to

  • work independently and not under the direct supervision of another teacher;
  • plan and deliver an approved curriculum to school / early childhood aged learners;
  • have direct teaching and learning relationships with your learners; 
  • select and use resources and / or modify your teaching practice in response to the learning needs of the learners; and assess learning, including reporting to parents / carers; and
  • undertake the Inquiry process and evidence all the 37 descriptors of the APST at the proficient level.

Do I have to complete 80 days of teaching before I start my inquiry?

You can start your inquiry and gather evidence before you have completed 80 days of teaching. You will need to have completed at least 80 days of teaching before you present to your recommendation panel.

What constitutes a day of teaching?

VIT defines 7.6 hours as equivalent to a day of teaching.

If you are employed as a teacher for a full day (ongoing, contract or casual), you can consider this a day of teaching.

If you are employed for half a day as teacher, regardless of face-to-face teaching time, VIT will consider this half a day of teaching.

Teaching hours include your face-to-face teaching time, as well as the time you spend preparing the learning environment and assessing learner’s work.

What is a ‘school’ setting’?

For teacher registration purposes, a school setting is an early childhood education service, primary, secondary, P-12 or special education school.

What is a ‘non-school’ setting in which I can undertake the (full) registration process?

With this specific teaching context, you will need to first contact VIT to verify whether you can use your practice within this setting to undertake the full registration process.

In general, the workplace should provide provisionally registered teachers (PRT) with the opportunity to teach learners and an experienced colleague or trained VIT mentor to work with you. The work you undertake must allow you to evidence the APST at the proficient level and must also provide opportunities for PRTs to

  • plan for and deliver approved curriculum; 
  • select and use resources and / or modify their teaching practice in response to the learning needs of their learners; and 
  • assess learning.

An approved school curriculum delivers one of the following

  • The Victorian Curriculum
  • The Australian National Curriculum;
  • The Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE);
  • The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL);
  • Vocational Education and Training (VET);
  • Any other curriculum or program approved by the Victorian Curriculum Assessment Authority (VCAA) or Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA);
  • The International Baccalaureate (IB) authorised by the International Baccalaureate Organisation;
  • A program that, in a non-government school, is authorised and reviewed by the Victorian Registration & Qualification Authority (VRQA) and is approved as the educational program of the school by the school’s governing body;
  • A program that forms part of the compulsory curriculum of a school for students attending that school;
  • A program that is comparable to an Australian Year 12 course as recognised by an Australian legislative framework; or 
  • An overseas curriculum delivered at a school registered with the VRQA as a ‘Specific Purpose’ school.

If you are working within these frameworks and the education leader of the non-school setting (who needs to be a VIT registered teacher) can verify this, then you can use this practice as teaching practice.

Examples of non-school settings where approved curriculum is taught may include the Melbourne Zoo, Royal Children’s Hospital, TAFE institutions offering the VCAL or VET programs (if they are teaching school aged students).

You must contact VIT to verify whether you can use this practice first before commencing the process.

What is ‘approved curriculum’?

Approved curriculum is defined as curriculum taught in settings requiring registration - early childhood education, primary, secondary, special education.

Early Childhood Education

  • The Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework; or
  • The Early Years Learning Framework.

School Foundation – Year 10

  • The Victorian Curriculum
  • Victorian Curriculum; or
  • International Baccalaureate.

School Years 11 - 12

  • Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE);
  • Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) or Vocational Education and Training (VET) (alternatives to VCE which are offered by some secondary schools and some TAFE institutions and Registered Training Organisations); School Based Apprenticeships and Traineeships (SBAT) (are available to students over 15 years); or
  • International Baccalaureate (IB).

An approved curriculum may also include

  • any other curriculum or program approved by the Victorian Curriculum Assessment Authority (VCAA) or Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), which is to be delivered in Victorian schools;
  • any element, in a non-government school approved as the compulsory educational program that is not otherwise included by the above programs;
  • an overseas curriculum delivered at a school registered with the VRQA as a ‘Specific Purpose’ school (the Japanese School of Melbourne is an example); or
  • a program that is comparable to an Australian Year 12 course as recognised by an Australian legislative framework (e.g. Monash University Foundation Year).

How long is evidence of professional practice valid for?

The evidence of practice is valid for five years. This is based on national consistency on what constitutes recency of practice. You are not able to use evidence of your practice that you gathered whilst a pre-service teacher. Evidence of professional practice must be gathered whilst you were a VIT registered teacher.

Can I undertake the (full) registration process interstate or overseas?

The inquiry into practice must be conducted within Victoria for (full) registration to be granted by VIT.

The inquiry cannot be undertaken overseas or in New Zealand. The only exception made to this is if a teacher is teaching at the international campus of a Victorian school e.g. Haileybury. In this situation, they will need to be teaching the approved curriculum and mentored by a VIT registered teacher.

PRTs working interstate or in New Zealand are encouraged to undertake their jurisdiction’s registration requirements.

The 80 days of teaching can be accumulated interstate or in New Zealand.

How do I undertake the (full) registration process as a CRT?

The process for moving to (full) registration is the same for a CRT as it is for any other teacher. There can be some additional challenges in completing this process as a CRT, but it is possible.

You will need to familiarise yourself with provisional to (full) process by reading our Supporting Provisionally Registered Teachers Guide PDF, 13152.59 KB and the CRT Companion Guide PDF, 2515.64 KB which outlines some additional strategies and information for CRTs undertaking the (full) registration process. Take the time to reflect on this process and how you may approach this within your specific context.

For more information on how you can undertake the full registration process as a CRT, please see the CRT FAQs.

Can I undertake the (full) registration process employed as a Tutor?

You are not able to use tutoring to undertake the (full) registration process. Tutoring does not involve developing, teaching, assessing and reporting on a program of study of an approved school curriculum (e.g. Victorian Curriculum, VCE, VCAL, IB etc). It also does not enable you to address all of the standards and associated descriptors at the proficient level.

Who can be my mentor?

VIT recommends a registered teacher who has participated in a VIT mentor training program (EMP or other program) act as your mentor. Where it is not possible to be supported by a VIT trained mentor, you may work with an experienced colleague e.g. team leader, year-level coordinator, learning leaders. However, there should be a VIT trained mentor on your workplace panel. Please refer to The Work Place Recommendation Panel guidelines PDF, 458.5 KB

What is the preferred panel make-up?

In a school setting, it is expected the panel generally comprises

  • your principal* (or their delegate) who assumes the role of panel chair;
  • a registered teacher who has participated in the VIT (EMP or other) mentor training program; and
  • a registered teaching colleague you nominate and who knows your work.

*To be part of a panel, a principal must be a registered teacher.

In an early childhood setting, it is expected the panel generally comprises

  • a registered early childhood teacher; 
  • a registered early childhood teacher or registered teacher who has participated in the VIT (EMP or other) mentor training program; and
  • another registered early childhood teacher or teacher colleague who you nominate and who knows your work.

On some occasions, there can be a variation to the panel, where it will be the principal or a principal’s delegate in attendance only. We tend to see this in schools located in remote locations. Please contact VIT to ask for approval to have an exemption to the recommended panel composition.

Can I undertake the (full) registration process at one workplace, but have the recommendation made by another school?

It is a requirement that the school recommendation is provided by the principal or their delegate at the workplace where most of the teaching practice has been undertaken and documented.

Before endorsing an application for (full) registration, a workplace needs to have observed the teacher’s practice over an extended period. The recommendation must be based on a consistent representation of practice over time and the principal or delegate must be satisfied that the teacher has provided sufficient evidence that the APST have been met.

If I have provisional registration in both categories (teacher / ECT), do I undertake the Inquiry process in each setting?

You should undertake the inquiry process in the setting you are teaching. Regardless of your context, all PRTs follow the same process to apply for (full) registration.

Successful completion of an application for (full) registration in one category of registration will lead to successful completion of (full) registration requirements in the other category of registration.

Who signs off on the recommendation report?

The recommendation report that attests to the PRT’s proficiency in the APST must be completed by the panel chair (a registered VIT principal or educational leader.) Where the principal or educational leader is not in a position to complete the recommendation report (e.g. they do not hold VIT registration) they can delegate the responsibility to an experienced teacher, who must hold (full) registration.

In an early childhood panel, the panel chair will complete the recommendation report. This may be the VIT trained mentor, or educational leader in the early childhood service provided they hold (full) registration.

How can I evidence Standard 1.4 if I do not have an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander learner?

You should consider the modifications to the curriculum and / or your practice you will need to make for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners to access learning.

If you do not have an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learner in your learning environment then you can

  • observe an experienced teacher’s practice and / or approach to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learner and base your demonstration of Standard 1.4 on another student in the school; or 
  • hypothetically include an Aboriginal and / or Torres Strait Islander learner to demonstrate the standard.

Then you will need to ask yourself

  • what would I do if I had this learner in my group? 
  • how would I design and implement effective teaching strategies that are responsive to the local community and cultural setting, linguistic background and histories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners?

You may find the following resource useful: Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners PDF, 223.39 KB

How can I evidence Standard 1.6 if I do not have any learners with a disability?

You should consider the modifications to the curriculum and / or your practice you will need to make to support the full participation of learners with a disability. It is estimated that approximately one quarter of learners in Victoria have special needs, so it is likely that you are teaching a learner with a special need. Think about what you can do to find out, speak with your workplace leadership if you are unsure.

The Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) provides a definition of learners with a disability. This is quite broad and includes

  • total or partial loss of the person's bodily or mental functions;
  • total or partial loss of a part of the body;
  • the presence in the body of organisms causing disease or illness;
  • the presence in the body of organisms capable of causing disease or illness;
  • the malfunction, malformation or disfigurement of a part of the person's body;
  • a disorder or malfunction that results in the person learning differently from a person without the disorder or malfunction; and
  • a disorder, illness or disease that affects a person's thought processes, perception of reality, emotions or judgement or that results in disturbed behaviour.

The definition of disability includes those learners with a disability who are supported by general resources available within the school or service, as well as learners who are receiving targeted specialist education services and supports.

The impact of the learner’s disability should result in the school or service actively addressing the learner’s specific individual education and learning and development needs arising from their disability. This should be done within quality differentiated teaching practice and / or by monitoring the learner, or providing a ‘supplementary’ / higher level of support.

Whilst this definition is broad and includes a wide range of disabilities such as dyslexia, dyscalculia, autism spectrum disorder or hearing and vision impairments, it does not include learners who speak English as a second language. This is considered a disadvantage, not a disability.

You may find the following resource useful: Working with learners with special needs PDF, 244.45 KB

Do I need to do 20 hours of PD as a PRT?

The 20 hours of professional development is a renewal of registration requirement for (fully) registered teachers. PRTs are not obligated to undertake set hours of PD to maintain provisional registration. It is expected that PRTs will continue their professional development through their inquiry in the (full) registration process.

What do I do if I can’t move to (full) registration within two years?

If you have been unable to undertake the (full) registration process within the first two years, you may apply for another period of provisional registration.

Reapplications for further periods of provisional registration are assessed on their individual merits and are not guaranteed approval. You will be required to submit detailed information outlining
  • why you have not been able to complete the inquiry approach and apply for (full) registration;
  • how you intend to do this in the next period of provisional registration (if granted); and
  • any other exceptional circumstances.

As an early childhood teacher, how can I find a mentor?

As a provisionally registered early childhood teacher, you may find the following suggestions helpful in connecting with a mentor

  • if your service is an Early Years Management (EYM) organisation, the EYM manager may be able to determine if there is a potential mentor at a nearby service;
  • if you are a member of an early childhood professional associations, you may contact them to find out if they are able to assist. Alternatively, you may consider joining one;
  • use your professional network or alumni contacts;
    consider networking opportunities such as conferences and professional development (your local government may also hold network events for early childhood services);
  • consider becoming a member of relevant early childhood social media pages;
  • if your service is coordinated by local government, the relevant officer at the local government office may be able to determine if there is a potential mentor at a nearby service; and
  • if your employer operates multiple services, your area manager or equivalent may be able to point you to an experienced teacher from another service.

The Department of Education and Training (DET) also operates a mentor map, which you can use to connect with local mentors in your area.

If you have any questions relating to the mentor map, or to add your service details to the interactive mentor map, contact DET’s early childhood mentoring team at ec.mentoring@edumail.vic.gov.au.

In exceptional circumstances, where there is no suitable mentor at your own or a nearby service, contacting the principal at a local primary school may be an option to find a potential mentor to
support you in the process to become (fully) registered.

Options to find an early childhood mentor should have been exhausted first, which may include a mentoring relationship using email, phone or web communication, rather than face-to-face.

How are the APST relevant to me as an early childhood teacher?

The APST are the teaching standards that all Australian teachers are expected to demonstrate, this includes teachers in a range of different contexts including schools, early childhood services and non-school settings.

Six Illustrations of Practice referencing kindergarten teaching in early childhood services have been produced through a partnership between VIT and the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL).

Can I undertake the provisional to (full) registration process if I am employed as an education support / teacher’s aide?

Teacher assistants and teacher / integration aides in a school context are not regarded as a teacher for the purposes of moving to (full) registration.

If you are performing the duties of a teacher’s aide or assistant then VIT cannot consider your practice for moving from provisional to (full) registration.

The Education and Training Reform Act 2006 (Vic) provides the following definition of a teacher:

“teacher”
a) means a person who, in a school, undertakes duties that include the delivery of an educational program or the assessment of student participation in an educational program; and;
c) does not include a teacher's aide, an assistant teacher or a student teacher;

Can I undertake the provision to (full) registration process if I am employed as an educator in an early childhood service?

Educators are not able to use this practice for the purposes of moving to (full) registration.

The Education and Training Reform Act 2006 (Vic) provides the following definition of an early
childhood teacher:

"early childhood teacher"
a) includes a preschool teacher and a kindergarten teacher; and 

b) does not include an educator (within the meaning of section 5 of the Education and Care Services National Law (Victoria)) or a staff member of a children's service (within the meaning of the Children's Services Act 1996 ), who does not hold an approved early childhood teaching qualification; and

In order for an early childhood teacher to use their practice to move to (full) registration, they must have all of the following requirements:

  • be employed as an early childhood teacher or a leader of an education program; 
  • have appropriate qualifications; and
  • be registered with VIT as an early childhood teacher.

The following will not contribute to meeting the professional practice requirements for registration:

  • being employed or engaged as an educator of an education and care service; 
  • being employed or engaged as an early childhood teacher assistant of an education and care service; and 
  • being employed or engaged as an educator assistant of an education and care service.

What age of learners do I need to be teaching in order to undertake the (full) registration process?

Generally a teacher will need to be teaching learners who are of compulsory school age, including up to 19 years old or pre-school aged (3-6 years).

For an early childhood teacher who is not teaching pre-school aged learners, they must have all of the following requirements in order to use their practice to move to (full) registration

  • be employed as an early childhood teacher or a leader of an education program; 
  • have appropriate qualifications; and
  • be registered with VIT as an early childhood teacher.

The leader of the education program must be appointed in writing by the education and care service, and is responsible for the development and implementation of an educational program in the education and care service.1

The educational program must be

  • based on an approved learning framework; 
  • delivered in a manner that accords with the approved learning framework; 
  • based on the developmental needs, interests and experiences of each child; and 
  • designed to take into account the individual differences of each child.2

The educational program must contribute to the following outcomes for each child

  • the child will have a strong sense of identity;
  • the child will be connected with and contribute to his or her world;
  • the child will have a strong sense of wellbeing; 
  • the child will be a confident and involved learner; and
  • the child will be an effective communicator.3

The delivery of the educational program also needs to be documented in the following ways

  • for all children of preschool age or under, there should be
    • assessments of the child’s developmental needs, interests, experiences and participation in the education program; and
    • assessments of the child’s progress against the outcomes of the educational program.4
  • for all children over preschool age, there should be evaluations of the child’s wellbeing, development and learning.5

1 Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011, Reg 118
2 Education and Care Services (National Law) Act 2010, Schedule 1, s. 168
3 Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011, Reg 73(2)
4 Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011, Reg 74(1)(a)
5 Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011, Reg 74(1)(b)

Does my mentor have to undertake all observations / professional discussions?

The full registration process requires you to

  • observe the practice of your mentor / experienced colleague at least once;
  • have your practice observed by your mentor / experienced colleague at least three times; and
  • engage in at least three professional discussions.

Any of the above requirements can be undertaken with your mentor, or with one or more experienced teaching colleagues, provided they hold (full) registration. In your context, it may be more appropriate, beneficial or practical to have more than one experienced colleagues supporting you to meet these requirements.

What can I do if I am not recommended for (full) registration and do not agree with the decision?

PRTs whose application for (full) registration is refused by VIT have a right to review to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT).

I am an experienced teacher, why do I have to do an inquiry?

The (full) registration process is used to provide a consistent means to evidence the standards that has comparability across schools and teaching contexts. It’s recognised as an effective vehicle for professional learning for teachers of any experience, so has value even if a teacher has taught extensively.

As an experienced teacher, you will understand our need to ensure all newly registered teachers meet the required professional practice standards. All teachers who are registered with VIT are required to do this, whether they have previous teaching experience or not. This is also consistent with the national agreements that apply to all Australian teacher regulators.

My tutoring college / workplace expects me to be registered, why can’t I use this practice to move to (full) registration?

Your employer may require you to be registered for employment purposes.

Requirements for employment are different to VIT registration requirements. VIT is bound by the Education and Training Reform Act 2006 (Vic) and works under this legislation to register school teachers and early childhood teachers. Consequently the requirements to move to (full) registration are grounded in demonstrating proficiency against the APST in school or early childhood settings and in some non-school settings.

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FAQs for mentors

Read our frequently asked questions about the Effective Mentoring Program (EMP).

How does The Victorian Teaching Profession Code of Conduct relate to the Early Childhood Australia Code of Ethics?

Early Childhood Australia’s Code of Ethics is a set of statements about appropriate and expected behaviour of early childhood professionals. It reflects current pedagogical research and practice, providing a framework for reflection about the ethical responsibilities of early childhood professionals.

The VIT Code of Conduct has been developed for and by the Victorian teaching profession; it identifies a set of principles, which describe the professional conduct, personal conduct and professional competence expected of a teacher by their colleagues and their community.

There are overlaps between the two codes in professional conduct and professional competence. These documents are complimentary and an early childhood teacher should conduct themselves in a manner that is consistent with both codes.

The Victorian Teaching Profession Code of Conduct applies to all teachers and early childhood teachers registered with VIT.

How can a provisionally registered teacher (PRT) demonstrate they are proficient in Standard 1.4, strategies for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander learners?

A PRT should consider individual children’s progress in relation to the Learning and Development Outcomes and / or the Victorian Curriculum, and any modifications to their practice they need to make for an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) learner to access the learning. The evidence of this will likely be in their programs and learning experiences / lesson or unit plans.

The following are some examples of evidence for descriptor 1.4:

  • develops and / or modifies programs and learning experiences / lesson or unit plans to include teaching strategies (such as story sharing or links to community) based on the local community and cultural setting, linguistic background and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners;
  • takes discussion and lesson observation notes that reflect understanding management of learner capabilities and behaviour that is sensitive to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners; and
  • takes conversation records from online forums about teaching strategies that are responsive to linguistic backgrounds and histories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners.

If a PRT does not have an Australian and Torres Strait Islander learner child in their group(s), the PRT can:

  • observe an experienced teacher’s practice and / or approach to an Australian and Torres Strait Islander learner and base their demonstration of Standard 1.4 on another child in the school; or 
  • hypothetically include an Aboriginal and / or Torres Strait Islander learner to demonstrate the standard.

Then the questions to ask are:

  • what would I do if I had this learner in my group? 
  • how would I design and implement effective teaching strategies that are responsive to the local community and cultural setting, linguistic background and histories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners?

There should be at least one professional discussion with the mentor that includes a few hypotheticals, which focus on what the PRT will do and how they will record the approach that they would take.

Teachers may find the following resources useful:

How can a PRT demonstrate they are proficient in Standard 1.6, strategies to support full participation of learners with a disability?

A PRT should consider the modifications to the curriculum and / or their practice they need to make to support the full participation of learners with a disability. The evidence of this will may be in the teacher’s program and individual learning experiences / lesson or unit plans.

The following are some examples of evidence for descriptor 1.6:

  • meets the learning needs of a learner with a disability through the differentiation of experiences and tasks recorded in the teaching program;
  • develops individual learning plans for learners with a disability;
  • indicates strategies that addresses disability policy or legislation through annotations in learning experiences / lesson or unit plans; and
  • designs and implements play and learning programs that utilise notes of meetings with families, specialist support teams or services.

The Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) provides a definition of learners with a disability. This is quite broad and includes:

  • total or partial loss of the person's bodily or mental functions;
  • total or partial loss of a part of the body;
  • the presence in the body of organisms causing disease or illness;
  • the presence in the body of organisms capable of causing disease or illness;
  • the malfunction, malformation or disfigurement of a part of the person's body;
  • a disorder or malfunction that results in the person learning differently from a person without the disorder or malfunction; and
  • a disorder, illness or disease that affects a person's thought processes, perception of reality, emotions or judgement or that results in disturbed behaviour.

The definition of disability includes those learners with a disability who are supported by general resources available within the school or service, as well as learners who are receiving targeted specialist education services and supports.

The impact of the learner’s disability should result in the school or service actively addressing the learner’s specific individual education and learning and development needs arising from their disability. This should be done within quality differentiated teaching practice and / or by monitoring the learner, or providing a ‘supplementary’ / higher level of support.

Whilst this definition is broad and includes a wide range of disabilities such as dyslexia, dyscalculia, autism spectrum disorder or hearing and vision impairments, it does not include learners who speak English as a second language. This is considered a disadvantage, not a disability.

Teachers may find the following resources useful:

Why doesn’t Victoria recognise a standards level beyond ‘proficient’ like other jurisdictions?

For a regulatory authority to recognise levels beyond proficient requires a certification process involving a rigorous and robust assessment of evidence of practice. Through this process, certified teachers demonstrate their impact on colleagues and students and develop a deep understanding of their own practice along with the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. Currently three states and one Territory have processes in place. In NSW and WA the accreditation process is linked to salary.

In 2011, the Victorian Premier rejected the offer to provide funding to undertake the accreditation process. In 2012, VIT undertook a pilot project with a group of non-government and government school teachers, looking at the Highly Accomplished and Lead Teacher certification process, however no implementation followed this project.

How will my PRT / mentor find out about the provisional to (full) registration requirements?

In order to create awareness of the provisional to (full) registration process VIT:

  • emails all PRTs at the beginning of the year to invite them to register for the Supporting Provisionally Registered teachers seminars; 
  • sends circulars to Principals and Early Childhood services asking them to inform their PRTs about the upcoming seminars;
  • publishes articles in Professional Practice;
  • provides comprehensive information on VIT’s website;
  • provides resources including podcasts, videos, Inquiry samples on VIT’s website
  • conducts PRT seminars – face to face and online;
  • provides the Supporting Provisionally Registered Teachers Guide PDF, 13152.59 KB; and
  • delivers presentations at Initial Teacher Education providers.

Where can a PRT learn more about the Code of Ethics and the Code of Conduct?

VIT has developed, and will continue to develop, a series of videos and podcasts on the Code of Conduct.

Early Childhood Australia’s Code of Ethics can be accessed here.

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FAQs for casual relief teachers

Read our frequently asked questions about specific information relating to CRTs. The registration requirements are the same for all teachers, regardless of their employment status. These FAQs should be read in conjunction with other information regarding registration.

(Fully) registered CRTs

Is there a separate category of registration for CRTs? Why does a CRT have to meet the same renewal requirements as all other teachers?

There is not a separate registration category for casual relief, relief or emergency teachers (CRTs). VIT is bound by the Education and Training Reform Act 2006 (Vic) which determines the different categories of registration. VIT registers all teachers regardless of their employment status.

A CRT registered with VIT is able to undertake the full duties of a teacher at any time, and therefore VIT needs to be assured that all teachers, including CRTs, meet the required professional practice standards, regardless of their employment status. This is consistent with the national agreements that apply to all teacher regulators in Australia.

What counts as professional development?

VIT uses the term professional development (PD) in reference to teacher registration and the renewal process, and recognises that it can also be referred to as professional learning (PL).

VIT does not have a definitive list of required PD activities for renewal of registration. You should consider your individual PD needs in relation to your teaching context, the needs of your learners and the priorities of your learning environment or education sector.

Professional learning is an ongoing process supported by planned learning activities and programs designed to enhance professional knowledge, practice and engagement.

You should engage in a range of activities that update your professional knowledge and practice. These may be undertaken individually or with colleagues, in your learning environment or externally and online or face-to-face. More information on what can constitutes PD is outlined here. Please note individual education settings may have specific professional development requirements for employment purposes.

The Teacher Learning Network (TLN) and the Department of Education will continue to provide free PD to all casual relief, relief, relieving and emergency teachers (CRTs) in 2019. To access this free PD go to www.crtpd.com and register to become a member. All courses address the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers and contribute to your VIT PD requirements for renewal of registration.

What constitutes a teaching day for renewal of registration?

A day of teaching as a CRT in a school setting can be determined by your payslip. For example, if you are employed for one day as a CRT, this will constitute a day of teaching for VIT renewal purposes, if you are employed for half a day this will constitute half a day of teaching for VIT renewal purposes.

If you are employed sessionally, a day of teaching is approximately 7.6 hours. The hours can consist face-face teaching time, as well as any time spent planning for the learning or assessing learners.

If you are unable to meet at least 20 days teaching in the past 12 months, you will be provided with the option at renewal to declare you have undertaken

  • 40 days in the previous two years; 
  • 60 days in the previous three years;
  • 80 days in the previous four years; or
  • 100 days in the previous five years.

If you are not currently employed as a teacher, you may also accumulate 20 days of practice through equivalent practice or educational leadership. 

Through equivalent practice you can

  • plan, teach and assess an approved curriculum to school aged learners; and
  • connect your practice to the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

Educational leadership may involve activities such as

  • developing resources and materials for use by teachers in schools or early childhood services;
  • research into teaching and learning and the dissemination of that knowledge to teachers and / or other educational leaders;
  • policy development to support and improve teaching and learning; and
  • working with teachers, either individually or collectively, to support and improve their professional knowledge and practice.

More information on these categories can be found here.

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Provisionally registered CRTs

How can I undertake the provisional to (full) process as a CRT?

The process for moving to (full) registration is the same for a CRT as it is for any other teacher. There can be some additional challenges in completing this process as a CRT, but it is possible.

We suggest that once you have been employed by one school / early childhood service a number of times, and have established a relationship with that workplace, you can approach the leadership about the possibility of gaining long-term employment and discuss if the workplace is willing to support you through the (full) registration process.

You will need to familiarise yourself with the provisional to (full) process by reading our Supporting Provisionally Registered Teachers Guide and the CRT companion guide which outlines some additional strategies and information for CRTs undertaking the (full) registration process. Take the time to reflect on this process and how you may approach this within your specific context. You may also wish to consider attending a face-to-face or online PRT seminar, which provides an overview of the (full) registration process. The dates and the process for registration at these seminars can be found here.

Remember that provisional registration lasts for two years, if you are seeking more permanent employment it may be worth waiting until you have a more permanent role to undertake the (full) registration process. 

Teachers working in a CRT capacity should

  • seek an extended period of time in one workplace where possible;
  • extend the amount of time in which the Inquiry process is undertaken; and
  • focus on a constant (e.g. a particular year level of learners or subject / learning area) or particular types of learners (e.g. catering for mixed ability classes) where they are not teaching the same learners.

Do I need a block of time in one workplace to undertake my inquiry?

It can be challenging to undertake the (full) registration process without an extended period with the same learners. It may be worth waiting until you have an extended block of time in one workplace to undertake your inquiry. We suggest around 4-6 weeks to undertake your inquiry for teachers in permanent employment, however, if you undertake this process as a CRT, be aware that it may take you longer than this time.

If your context means that you are not working with the same learners and do not have the opportunity to have an extended period of employment in one workplace, you will need to consider how you can undertake an inquiry into your practice in this context. Some suggestions and strategies to approach the (full) registration process in these contexts be found in our CRT companion guide.

How can I connect with a mentor as a CRT?

We suggest that once you have been employed by the same school / service a number of times and developed a relationship with that workplace, you may consider approaching the leadership to see if they would be willing to support you through the (full) registration process and connect you with a mentor or an experienced colleague.

Who can be my mentor?

We recommend that a registered teacher who has participated in a VIT (EMP or other) mentor training program acts as your mentor. Where it is not possible to be supported by a trained mentor, you may work with an experienced colleague.

Does the 80 days of teaching have to be completed in one school / service?

You can undertake the 80 days of practice in more than one workplace setting. As long as you can provide evidence that you have taught for 80 days in Australian or New Zealand schools or services over the past five years, these can be in more than one school or service. The evidence can be in the form of statement of service, pay slips or letter / email from the workplace. 

It is recommended that before a workplace panel endorses an application for full registration, the workplace needs to have observed the teacher’s practice over an extended period and sight the evidence of teaching days. 

The workplace panel will make their recommendation for full recommendation based on a consistent representation of practice over time. The principal, panel chair or their delegate must be satisfied that the teacher has undertaken the Inquiry process and provided sufficient evidence that the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers at the Proficient Teacher level have been met.

Make sure that if you have completed your 80 days of teaching in more than one school / service that you can provide evidence of your teaching days to the recommendation panel.

Can my 80 days be a mixture of paid employment and volunteering?

The 80 days can be a mixture of paid employment and non-paid employment. If you are engaged in non-paid teaching work, you need to

  • work independently and not under the direct supervision of another teacher;
  • plan and deliver an approved curriculum to school / early childhood aged learners;
  • have direct teaching relationships with your learners;
  • select and use resources and / or modify your teaching practice in response to the learning needs of the learners; and assess learning, including reporting to parents / carers; and
  • undertake the Inquiry process and evidence all the 37 descriptors of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers at the proficient level.

Do I have to complete 80 days of teaching before I start my inquiry?

You can start your inquiry and gather evidence before you have completed 80 days of teaching. You will need to have completed at least 80 days of teaching before you present to your recommendation panel.

Who signs off on the recommendation report?

The recommendation report that attests to the provisionally registered teacher’s proficiency in the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers must be completed by a registered VIT principal or panel chair. Where the principal or panel chair is not in a position to complete the recommendation report, they can delegate the responsibility to an experienced teacher, who must hold (full) registration.

Can I complete the process at one school, but have the recommendation made by another school?

It is a requirement that the school recommendation is provided by the principal or their delegate at the school where most of the teaching practice has been undertaken and documented.

Before endorsing an application for (full) registration, a school needs to have observed the teacher’s practice over an extended period. The recommendation must be based on a consistent representation of practice over time and the principal or delegate must be satisfied that the teacher has provided sufficient evidence that the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers have been met.

Can I undertake the evidence-based process when teaching in a non-school setting?

As long as your work involves developing, teaching, assessing and reporting on a program of study of an approved school curriculum (e.g. AusVELS / Victorian Curriculum, VCE, VCAL, IB etc) and allows you to address all of the standards and associated descriptors.

You will also need to be teaching children or young adults of school age.

Examples of non-school settings where approved curriculum is taught may include the Melbourne Zoo, Royal Children’s Hospital and TAFE institutions offering the VCAL or VET programs (if they are teaching school aged students).

The CRT companion guide can provide some additional assistance and guidance to teachers undertaking the (full) registration process in a non-school setting.

Do I need to do 20 hours of PD as a PRT?

The 20 hours of professional development is a renewal of registration requirement for (fully) registered teachers. Provisionally registered teachers are not obligated to undertake set hours of PD to maintain provisional registration. It is expected that PRTs will continue their professional development through their inquiry in the (full) registration process.

What do I do if I can’t move to (full) registration within two years?

If you have been unable to undertake the (full) registration process within the first two years, you may apply for another period of provisional registration.

Reapplications for further periods of provisional registration are assessed on their individual merits and are not guaranteed approval.

You will be required to submit detailed information outlining

  • why you have not been able to complete the inquiry approach and apply for (full) registration;
  • how you intend to do this in the next period of provisional registration (if granted); and
  • any other exceptional circumstances.

What constitutes a day of teaching?

VIT defines 7.6 hours as equivalent to a day of teaching.

If you are employed as a teacher for a full day (ongoing, contract or casual), you can consider this a day of teaching. 

If you are employed for half a day as teacher, regardless of face-to-face teaching time, VIT will consider this half a day of teaching.

Teaching hours include your face-to-face teaching time, as well as the time you spend preparing the learning environment and assessing learner's work.

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FAQs for LANTITE

Read our frequently asked questions about the Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education Students (LANTITE).

Do I need to pass LANTITE?

The literacy and numeracy test for initial teacher education (LANTITE) is how initial teacher education (ITE) graduates demonstrate that they have the required personal literacy and numeracy levels to work as a teacher in Australia.

If you graduated from a Victorian ITE program after 1 July 2016, you are required to pass LANTITE before applying for registration as a teacher with VIT.

If you were enrolled in an accredited ITE program anywhere in Australia on or after 1 January 2017, the LANTITE requirement is part of your ITE program and must be met before graduation. Your ITE provider can advise you when within your program you will be required to meet the test.

Can I have a temporary registration while I complete the test?

No, if you do not hold registration with VIT and have not met the standard, you cannot apply for registration. From 1 January 2019 you must meet the LANTITE requirement before applying for registration.

I have questions about the test. Where can I find more information?

The Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) is responsible for administering the test. The test is available at set times (‘test windows’) throughout the year.

You have the flexibility to register and sit each test component separately and may sit the test either remotely or in a physical test centre (where available).

If you have questions about the test, please refer to the ACER website or contact ACER directly.

How many times can I sit LANTITE?

You are permitted to sit each component of the test up to three times under the Commonwealth policy.

If there are special or extenuating circumstances, you may be granted further attempts to sit test components (with a maximum of five test attempts). The fourth and fifth attempt are facilitated by your ITE provider or VIT (if you hold registration).

If you hold VIT registration and have used your three attempts, we will contact you directly regarding your options including how to demonstrate special or extenuating circumstances.

How do I prepare for an attempt at LANTITE?

You should contact your ITE Provider and ask how they can assist you to meet this requirement. Many Victorian universities now offer LANTITE preparation courses and have resources on their websites for past and present students. We would encourage you to contact your university to see if they can provide any further support programs to their alumni.

In addition, ACER provided advice on their website about Test taking Strategy and Practice Material. For further information about what the test covers and how it is assessed please read the Described Proficiency Scale document.

What happens if I don’t meet the standard?

It will depend on how many times you have sat the test, and how close to the expiry of your provisional registration you are.

VIT receives results after each testing window directly from ACER and will be in contact to update you regarding your specific situation and options. We monitor how many attempts you have made, as well as when you last attempted the test to ensure you meet the LANTITE requirement as soon as possible.

If you do not hold registration with VIT and have not met the standard, you cannot apply for registration. From 1 January 2019 you must meet the LANTITE requirement before applying for registration.

I have the Literacy and Numeracy condition on my registration. How long do I have to pass LANTITE?

Provisional registration is granted for a period of two years. If you have been granted provisional registration with a Literacy and Numeracy condition, you are expected to meet the LANTITE requirement within this period. 

If you do not meet the LANTITE requirement before the end of your two year provisional registration period, your registration will expire and you will be unable to work as a teacher. 

VIT recommend that you make it a priority to sit and pass LANTITE as soon as possible, and we suggest that you seek support from your Initial Teacher Education provider to give yourself the best chance of success.

Please note that if your two years of provisional registration expires before you have used all of your test attempts, you can continue to sit the test. Once you pass, you may reapply for registration with VIT.

Can I move to full registration if I hold the Literacy and Numeracy condition on my registration?

No, you are not able to complete the provisional to (full) process until you have met the LANTITE requirement and had the condition removed from your registration.

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